health is an issue because people don’t realize we really are walking temples. divine beings, people have no respect for the body. Overlyxclusive (via kushandwizdom)
794 notes

brysob:

Shows that need to be on netflix:

  • Sister Sister
  • Fresh Prince of Bel Air
  • Thats so Raven
  • Martin
  • My Wife and Kids
  • The Proud Family
  • Class of 3000
  • Moesha
  • The Parkers
13,181 notes

wilwheaton:

mjolnirismypenis:

imnothavinit:

Notice something in common in these photos?

It’s not what you think

I gave it away in the third pic

That’s right! None of these cops are wearing badges or name tags! I wonder why… seems like it’d be important to wear those, since it’s even illegal not to in other states…

This is actually illegal in all states. A police officer must be marked as such with name and badge at all times unless their jurisdiction states otherwise (such as an undercover officer), and even when not wearing a badge, the officer must have the badge accessible at all times and must show the badge in order to make an arrest. Name tags are not required as long as a badge is available because the badge has the officer number on it.

This has really been bothering me. The police in Ferguson are breaking the law by concealing their identities. Everyone knows this, it’s been going on for ten days, and it appears that nobody is doing anything about it.

The police are clearly and systematically violating the first amendment rights of the press, and they are getting away with it. This has been happening for days, and nobody appears to be doing anything about it.

A police officer pointed a rifle at a journalist and told him to fuck off *while he was being filmed, so he’s easily identifiable by his superiors*, and that police officer still has a job.

I know that not all cops are bad (or even most cops), but there are clearly bad cops in Ferguson, and they’re acting with complete impunity. I don’t understand why those cops aren’t being taken off the scene, and why a higher (possibly federal) authority isn’t coming in to address these things.

(via toots-toots)

51,324 notes
durq:

this is so important

durq:

this is so important

(via toots-toots)

gallifreyglo:

dichotomized:

U.S. Martin Luther King Jr being attacked as he marched nonviolently for the Chicago Freedom Movement, 1966, which was the most ambitious civil rights campaign in the North of the United States, and lasted from mid-1965 to early 1967.

If only he’d been well-spoken, pulled his pants up and didn’t wear a hoodie… oop… wait…

gallifreyglo:

dichotomized:

U.S. Martin Luther King Jr being attacked as he marched nonviolently for the Chicago Freedom Movement, 1966, which was the most ambitious civil rights campaign in the North of the United States, and lasted from mid-1965 to early 1967.

If only he’d been well-spoken, pulled his pants up and didn’t wear a hoodie… oop… wait…

(via toots-toots)

ayothewuisback:

"It’s not about race!"

So I guess the Ku Klux Klan showed up for some fresh air, then?

(via toots-toots)

15,293 notes

ottoreal:

"Let her speak when we get to the black topics."

Why does this not have a Billion notes!!!!!!

(Source: lordofthewolves, via napturalgirl)

18,782 notes

In 2007, I was twenty-four. I had just taken and passed the bar exam. I was admitted to practice on a trillion-dollar terror financing lawsuit, which required months of depositions of thousands of terror victims in the United States and in Israel.

One day, during a trip to New York for a hearing, I became involved in a conversation about my work—that happened often with a job like mine. The woman I spoke to was immediately interested. Her teenage daughter had been in an accident with her friends, and was the only survivor. She suffered from PTSD, which I knew all too much about, thanks to my work.

As this woman spoke to me about a lawsuit she and her husband were considering against the owner of the property, a girl appeared behind her, and I was immediately struck by her presence. The girl was beautiful but haunted, somehow.

Her mother and I exchanged information, and I agreed to get her a referral to another lawyer who’d be well-equipped to take on their case. But when the woman turned to leave, the girl gave me a look that stopped me cold. A look that told me there was more to her story than anyone knew.

I wondered what it was.

Fast forward to May 14th, 2009. I was in New York again, not for a hearing but for my brother’s college graduation. After the ceremony, something was mentioned that instantly made me think of that girl. I wondered what had happened to her.

Later that day, I called the number that the woman gave me, but it was out of service. I looked up her name, too, but couldn’t find her listed anywhere.

I began writing the first words of The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer that night. I wrote until five p.m. the next day, when I had 5,000 words. The story grew, with that girl at its center. I would never use her real name, so she became Mara; the name means “bitterness” in Hebrew.

A few weeks later, I began to receive packages.

Pictures of a collapsed building. A sketchbook of drawings. I kept writing. What emerged was a story told in artifacts and mementos, from a life that didn’t seem to exist in the world we knew but just beneath it. I’m still receiving envelopes and packages.

And one day, I received a letter from a teenage girl. What it said was obviously impossible.

But I guess you never really know.

Michelle Hodkin on her inspiration to write the Mara Dyer Series (via indespairs)
1,199 notes

perfectiero:

you know that one album that youve listened to so many times and youd defend it with your life and you can anticipate every single little note that comes after the other and you can sing along to every word and it just has a special place in your heart that no other album can fill

(via bookmad)

35,423 notes

saxas:

People love watching and reading about dystopias and rebellions, but when it happens in real life suddenly those people are demonizing the resistance and championing the oppressors as the protectors of society. 

(via bookmad)

38,038 notes